Pain and Relationships

Category: chronic pain

Being in agony can be difficult for the person living with it, but it can also have an impact on the people around them. Family, friends, coworkers, and even strangers may feel the effects of a person who is experiencing chronic pain in Glendale.

Being hurt could mean that a person has limited mobility. If that’s the case, they may not be able to do the things they used to do, such as cleaning the house or their job. They may have to rely on others to assist them, and this could cause issues such as resentment (for both the person who is in agony and those who have to pick up the slack) or a sense of failure (mainly for the person who is hurt because they can’t do their jobs).

In addition, being in agony might make it difficult for the person to do physical activities with their children. This could lead to the children and the individual feeling like they are missing out or that they aren’t as involved in their kids’ lives as they want to be.

The emotional turmoil that comes with the physical ailments can be just as debilitating and lead the person into a spiral of shame, guilt, anxiety, and/or depression. This can also impact relationships because the individual may not feel they are worthy of being around others or that they aren’t as enjoyable because they can’t participate in activities.

There are ways to manage and repair relationships when dealing with chronic pain in Glendale, and this is beneficial to everyone. The first step involves the individual recognizing that they have limitations. Trying to push beyond the hurt and pretend that nothing is wrong could lead to more issues and more agony.

Communicating with a spouse and children about what an individual is capable of doing and what they need help doing could help smooth over the resentment and confusion. Keeping a spouse informed about the levels of agony and what they can or can’t do in the intimate part of the relationship will help ensure that no one feels neglected and that they can still express their love for one another physically.

When people are in a lot of agony, they’ll often withdraw from extended family and friends, which can make them feel isolated and lonely. Staying in contact with others, even if it’s through texting or emails, is a good way to fight off loneliness. Again, communicating with others about what a person is going through will help them understand.

Being in chronic pain in Glendale is difficult for the individual to deal with, but it can also impact relationships. There are ways to stay connected and close during the healing process.